How big will the ship be?
How long will it take to build?
How much will the ship cost and how much money has been raised so far?
What makes this ship sustainable?
What's the historical connection?
What's the ship's purpose, who will sail on her?
Where will the ship be docked once she is complete?
Where's does the funding come from?
Who will build it?
Why are you using wood?
Why build in Sausalito?
Why so many sails, what's a brigantine?


Q: How big will the ship be?

A:

132’ over all, 100’ on deck, 25’ wide, 10’ draft (deep in the water), 175 tons weight and the mainmast will be 100 feet tall.



Q: How long will it take to build?

A:

18 to 24 months from when we lay the keel.



Q: How much will the ship cost and how much money has been raised so far?

A:

The total projected cost of the ship is $6.2 million dollars. This cost covers the construction of the vessel and the development of educational programs. We have raised $5 million in cash, pledges and in-kind donations.



Q: What makes this ship sustainable?

A:

All the materials and methods used will be of the highest sustainable and recyclable standards available. Plus, the ship will produce her own energy and propulsion needs through a state-of-the-art hybrid system using wind power to produce electrical generation.



Q: What's the historical connection?

A:

The vessel is based on renowned Bay Area ship builder, Matthew Turner, and his design of the Galilee, which came to rest at the foot of Napa Street in Sausalito. Her stern is permanently on display at Fort Mason in the GGNRA.



Q: What's the ship's purpose, who will sail on her?

A:

The purpose is to build a ship that will allow young and old to experience firsthand, the power of nature and learn their connection to the marine environment and its history, plus be inspired to work together to become better stewards of our world.



Q: Where will the ship be docked once she is complete?

A:

Thanks to the Army Corps of Engineers, she will be docked at the Bay Model Visitor Center’s Pier in Sausalito. This location will allow school children to learn about the Bay’s unique geography and hydrology while on field trips and then come aboard for a sailing adventure.



Q: Where's does the funding come from?

A:

Funds have received, both small and large donations, from individuals and Foundations that share the values of the Educational Tall Ship’s mission.



Q: Who will build it?

A:

Educational Tall Ship, Inc., a devision of Call of the Sea, a 501(c) 3 non-profit organization, is the ownerbuilder. Tri-Coastal Marine, Inc’s naval architects and their engineers will oversee quality control and act as agents for USCG vessel certification. The building crew will comprise of Sausalito and Bay Area, shipwrights, carpenters, marine technicians, volunteers and students.



Q: Why are you using wood?

A:

Wood is a renewable local resource that is environmentally friendly. We are using sustainable timber having a FSC designation. By building in the traditional way, we honor the knowledge, skills and master craftsmanship historically used in our nineteenth century San Francisco ship yards. Nothing matches the warmth and beauty of wood. The use of wood allows volunteers, trainees, and visitors a chance to participate with pride. With proper maintenance, we believe this ship will still be sailing for a hundred years.



Q: Why build in Sausalito?

A:

Sausalito is a great place to build, due to its central location, easy public access and strong community support. There is also a vibrant boating community with many skilled maritime workers who would benefit from the commerce and exposure. Honoring Sausalito’s long maritime tradition by building here will allow the community to continue to be acknowledged as a maritime leader in the Bay Area.



Q: Why so many sails, what's a brigantine?

A:

The eleven sails offer a perfect opportunity to engage the many students in an exciting and meaningful hands-on experience. They must use team work and communicate well to power the ship safely. Brigantines have square sails on the fore mast for fast down wind and beam reach sailing. They were an advanced design and a technologically superior rig of the 19th century for both ocean passages and coastal sailing. They were displaced when fossil fuel based steamships became cheaper to operate. Going aloft into the rig to set and take in the square sails is a right of passage and an experience that is never forgotten.